How did your career start in the music industry? 

    "When I was a kid, if you played or owned an instrument, you were in a band. No matter how good or bad your were, someone would ask you to be a member of a band. So when I was 14 I bought myself a Farfisa organ, and played the keys in a band that was called the The Starfires. Sometimes I would sing James Brown's "Please, Please, Please"--cape and all-- he was 'The Guy' at the time."

 

After being in a band, how did your career transition from being a musician to an industry professional? 

    "I went to Northeastern University, I got my minor in music and my major was in finance; I was really a financial guy who realized I would have no career as a musician. I was in the co-op program, where you would work for 3-9 months and go to school for 3-9 months, trading off each year.  I landed a job working for the Gillette company, and it was then that a friend of mine from my original band days, Brad Delp of Boston, connected me to Paul Ahern who I worked with. Paul's management company included the band Boston.  I did that for a number of years."

 

How did your career in the music industry continue after that? 

    "I transitioned out of the music industry, into real estate development in Southern California. I sold my company in the late 80's and it was then that Gary Bettman, the commissioner of the NHL, introduced me to the Maloof family of New Mexico and Las Vegas. The family wanted to buy an NHL team and wanted to build casinos in Las Vegas. I ended up partnering with them for twenty years, the family's ventures included the NBA franchise the Sacramento Kings and a number of casinos in Las Vegas including The Palms. The Palms became the place to be, where the who's-who of the music industry would hangout every weekend. I became very close  friends with Jimmy Iovine and created a label venture within Interscope. That was my official transition back into music."

 

How did things unfold for you after that, in the rock world?

     "While I was working with the Maloofs, a very smart, young man came to us looking for an investment in his blossoming festival company; his name was Danny Wimmer. He and I became very close friends, and I became the Vice Chairman of his company Danny Wimmer Presents. We worked together for a number of years, strategizing the growth of his company." 

 

While you were working with Danny Wimmer Presents, you must have been at a ton of amazing rock festivals. What is your favorite festival memory? 

    "Boy, I have so many. I think the most rewarding moments of Wimmer Festivals, was spending time meeting amazing people and establishing long lasting friendships. I can call Kirk Hammett of Metallica, Shawn Crahan (Clown) of Slipknot, and many others my friends. I enjoy hanging out and talking with very creative people."

 

So how did the concept of EDGEOUT Records come along? 

     "Well, while I was attending so many music festivals, and seeing so many bands,  I realized that there wasn't a label that was focused on developing rock artists. I felt the time was right, and I believed that the pendulum was turing back in the direction of rock music. I met with Boyd Muir, EVP, CFO, and President of Operations for Universal Music Group; Boyd was supportive of my vision and the process began. It took approximately two years for everything to be put in place for EDGEOUT, we signed our first band in January of 2019, The Jacks."